02071831101

Spring Budget 2023 – Whats the news for homeowners?

Table of Contents

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt unveils a “Budget for growth,” pledging billions of pounds to boost business investment and implementing measures to support the UK workforce. Major initiatives include a £4bn expansion of free childcare for one and two-year-olds in England to encourage parents to return to work earlier. Hunt aims to stimulate growth by removing obstacles to business investment, addressing labor shortages, and breaking down barriers to employment. The budget introduces a new multibillion-pound regime of capital allowances and other reforms to spur investment. Hunt also announces measures to address the 1.1 million job vacancies in the UK labor market and relax rules on migrant workers. Although the budget contains measures to tackle the cost of living, the medium-term outlook for public finances is not expected to significantly improve.

What about mortgages and housing?

There appears to be nothing at all that would benefit the housing and mortgage industries in this budget, however dig a little deeper and some of these changes will affect how much lenders are able to offer new borrowers. Childcare is one of the most significant costs families face and as a result lenders take this into account, often factoring between £600 and £900 a month in costs, which has a huge impact.

However, The Spring Budget 2023 has brought forth a series of changes in the childcare sector, which are expected to have a significant impact on mortgage affordability for families. The additional funding provided for childcare support is a major development, as it aims to make housing finance more accessible for families who previously struggled to meet eligibility criteria under the existing system.

The childcare system, which currently offers 30-free hours to eligible children, will be extended to include children as young as nine months. The phased introduction of this extension is set to begin in April 2024, with full implementation by September 2025. This change is poised to alleviate financial pressure on working parents, thus improving mortgage affordability.

Several other modifications were confirmed in the budget, including adjustments to the way households receiving Universal Credit obtain childcare support, increased government funding for childcare providers, £600 grants for new childcare workers, and relaxed child-to-staff ratios for two-year-olds. These changes are designed to enhance the childcare system in the UK and make it more conducive to mortgage eligibility for families.

The significance of these changes cannot be understated, as UK parents currently pay the highest childcare fees among developed nations, according to the OECD. Furthermore, three-quarters of mothers report that it is not financially viable for them to work due to exorbitant childcare costs. The budget aims to address these concerns by making childcare more affordable and accessible for families.

In terms of financial support for childcare providers, the government plans to allocate over £4.1 billion by 2027-28 to fund the extension of the childcare system for younger children. However, some campaigners argue that this funding may not fully bridge the existing financial shortfall between the government’s free hours and the amount providers receive.

For Universal Credit claimants, the budget outlines changes in the way they pay for childcare costs, with eligible parents receiving childcare payments upfront rather than in arrears. This reform aims to encourage low-income parents to return to work or increase their working hours, which could subsequently improve their mortgage affordability.

The Spring Budget 2023 has undoubtedly introduced significant changes to the UK’s childcare system, which are expected to have a positive impact on mortgage affordability for families. While some concerns remain about whether government funding will fully address the existing financial shortfall, these changes are, overall, a step in the right direction towards a more accessible and affordable childcare system for families across the country.

What’s in today’s budget? Chancellor Jeremy Hunt unveils a “Budget for growth,” pledging billions of pounds to boost business investment and implementing measures to support the UK workforce. Major initiatives include a £4bn expansion of free childcare for one and two-year-olds in England to encourage parents to return to work earlier. Hunt aims to stimulate growth by removing obstacles to business investment, addressing labor shortages, and breaking down barriers to employment. The budget introduces a new multibillion-pound regime of capital allowances and other reforms to spur investment. Hunt also announces measures to address the 1.1 million job vacancies in the UK labor market and relax rules on migrant workers. Although the budget contains measures to tackle the cost of living, the medium-term outlook for public finances is not expected to significantly improve.

How does this affect mortgages and housing? At first glance, it may seem like there’s nothing in the budget that directly benefits the housing and mortgage industries. However, if you dig a little deeper, some of these changes will impact how much lenders can offer to new borrowers. Childcare is one of the most significant costs families face, and as a result, lenders take this into account, often factoring between £600 and £900 a month in costs, which has a massive impact.

The Spring Budget 2023 introduces a series of changes in the childcare sector, which are expected to have a significant effect on mortgage affordability for families. The additional funding provided for childcare support is a major development, as it aims to make housing finance more accessible for families who previously struggled to meet eligibility criteria under the existing system.

The childcare system, which currently offers 30-free hours to eligible children, will be extended to include children as young as nine months. The phased introduction of this extension is set to begin in April 2024, with full implementation by September 2025. This change is poised to alleviate financial pressure on working parents, thus improving mortgage affordability.

Several other modifications were confirmed in the budget, including adjustments to the way households receiving Universal Credit obtain childcare support, increased government funding for childcare providers, £600 grants for new childcare workers, and relaxed child-to-staff ratios for two-year-olds. These changes are designed to enhance the childcare system in the UK and make it more conducive to mortgage eligibility for families.

The significance of these changes cannot be understated, as UK parents currently pay the highest childcare fees among developed nations, according to the OECD. Furthermore, three-quarters of mothers report that it is not financially viable for them to work due to exorbitant childcare costs. The budget aims to address these concerns by making childcare more affordable and accessible for families.

In terms of financial support for childcare providers, the government plans to allocate over £4.1 billion by 2027-28 to fund the extension of the childcare system for younger children. However, some campaigners argue that this funding may not fully bridge the existing financial shortfall between the government’s free hours and the amount providers receive.

For Universal Credit claimants, the budget outlines changes in the way they pay for childcare costs, with eligible parents receiving childcare payments upfront rather than in arrears. This reform aims to encourage low-income parents to return to work or increase their working hours, which could subsequently improve their mortgage affordability.

In conclusion, the Spring Budget 2023 has undoubtedly introduced significant changes to the UK’s childcare system, which are expected to have a positive impact on mortgage affordability for families. While some concerns remain about whether government funding will fully address the existing financial shortfall, these changes are, overall, a step in the right direction towards a more accessible and affordable childcare system for families across the country and a positive boost for those looking to get on the ladder

Author: Stuart Phillips

Author: Stuart Phillips

Fully CeMap qualified, Directly Authorised by the FCA and with over a decade of experience, Stuart has a wealth of experience in both specialist BTL and residential mortgages.

Need help with UK Mortgages?

Here at AALTO Mortgages we have extensive experience with UK Mortgages. Click below for contact options , or call now on 020 7183 1101 to speak with an experienced broker.
Get in touch

Contact Us

020 7183 1101

Services we offer

Related Articles

Landlords Face Five-Year Deadline for EPC Goals: Exploring Funding Solutions and Challenges

A Glimpse of Hope Amidst Banking Concerns? Swap rates and the BoE rate.

Multi-Generation Mortgages

Vector art showing a house against a calendar

5 Useful Resources All About LISAs for First-Time Buyers

Sign Up to the Newsletter

Get a weekly newsletter  with the latest rates, industry news and featured posts